Health And Wellness

Health And Wellness

How Long Does It Take for Nortriptyline to Take Effect?

How Long Does It Take for Nortriptyline to Take Effect?
Nortriptyline is a prescription-only medication approved for the treatment of depression or major depressive disorder (MDD). It belongs to the group of second-generation tricyclic antidepressant (TCA). Just like most antidepressive agents in this group, nortriptyline starts to take effect around two weeks; however, significant therapeutic effects can take longer to achieve. Remission has been reported within 10–14 weeks using standard antidepressants. But 30% to 45% of treated patients will only experience modest effects, and a considerable number of patients will not have satisfactory improvement despite long-term therapy. The challenges of antidepressant therapy While there are other treatment modalities available for depression, antidepressant drugs remain the standard of care. There are many types of commercially available antidepressants that have shown excellent efficacy and safety profiles through the years. Yet, the use of pharmacological methods to treat depre ...

How Long Does It Take for Dexilant To Work?

How Long Does It Take for Dexilant To Work?
Dexilant (dexlansoprazole) is a new-generation proton pump inhibitor (PPI) that is licensed to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children and adults. While PPIs are the mainstay of treatment in acid-related conditions, dexlansoprazole has a unique dual-release formulation that sets it apart from its contemporaries. It produces a peak plasma level at about one hour after administration. Its second component then produces a second peak after four hours, further extending its therapeutic effects. In the early 1990s, a new class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors entered the US market and revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders. Up to this day, they are considered the best therapeutic option for GERD. Not surprisingly, they are also the first-line treatment for non-erosive reflex disease (NERD), functional dyspepsia, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, peptic ulcer disease, and prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) associated ulc ...

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